The Department of Geosciences presents

Geology Open Night

Spring 2018

 

 

North Korea’s September 2017 Nuclear
Test and Its Aftermath

Lianxing Wen

7:30 PM Friday
Feb. 23, 2018
ESS 001

Dealing with Length and Time Scales in Measurements on the Earth and in the Lab

Donald Weidner

7:30 PM Friday
Mar. 30, 2018
ESS 001

TBA

Joel Hurowitz

7:30 PM Friday
April 27, 2018
ESS 001

 

Earth and Space Sciences Building 
Lecture Hall (Room 001)
SUNY Stony Brook Campus

There will be Refreshments after the Geology Open Night Presentations.

Admission is Free!!

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How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?


Geology Open night lectures are usually on topics in the geosciences related to the current research of the faculty, staff and students at SUNY Stony Brook. These presentations are intended for:

  • those interested in new developments in the sciences

  • earth science high school students and teachers

  • undergraduate and graduate students in geosciences

  • professional geologists

One hour toward professional development is available for teachers and professional geologists attending the Geology Open Night lectures.

 

North Korea’s September 2017 Nuclear Test and Its Aftermath

Lianxing Wen

7:30 PM Friday
Feb. 23, 2018
ESS 001

On 3 September 2017, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) announced that it had successfully conducted a thermonuclear (hydrogen bomb) test. The nuclear test was collaborated by reports of a seismic event with a magnitude ranging from 6.1 to 6.3 by many governmental and international agencies, although its thermonuclear nature remains to be confirmed. Unlike the previous nuclear tests in the region, this nuclear test was followed by a series of small seismic events, with the first one occurring about eight-and-a-half minutes after the nuclear test, two on 23 September 2017, one on 12 October 2017 and several after 2 December 2017. This talk will discuss the seismic results about that nuclear test, the nature of those small seismic events and the crucial information those small seismic events carry about the status of the nuclear test site and environmental impacts in the region.

Professor Wen is a theoretical and observational seismologist and geodynamicist. His research is directed toward understanding the structure, dynamics, composition and evolution of the Earth. He uses seismic waves to probe the internal structure of the Earth and its change with time, combines seismic and mineral physics data to constrain the composition of the mantle, and develops geodynamical models of how Earth's internal processes govern the Earth's continental drift, surface uplift, surface large igneous province, geochemistry, intra-plate deformation and volcanism.  

Professor Wen is a recipient of the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Macelwane Medal honors “significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability” and AGU fellowship is a designation conferred upon not more than 0.1% of all AGU members in any given year.

Dealing with Length and Time Scales in
Measurements on the Earth and in the Lab
 

Donald Weidner

7:30 PM Friday
Mar. 30, 2018
ESS 001

In this talk, we will examine seismic velocity and rock viscosity and some of the experimental challenges of measuring properties in the laboratory that can inform us about the Earth. Seismic waves thoroughly sample the Earth’s interior.  By extracting the speed that these waves travel, we recover information about the material at that place in the Earth.  Rock viscosity is essential for plate tectonics to occur. If we know the viscosity, we can place constraints on the plate tectonic process.

We will focus on the role of scale that is needed to make successful experiments.  In particular, the Earth is large, several thousand kilometers, but samples are small, millimeters or even microns.  Time for the Earth is enduring, but in the lab, an hour may be a long time.  What are the limitations of this scale difference and how do we strategize to overcome the difference?  Furthermore, what role do pressure and temperature play?

Dr. Weidner received his undergraduate education from Harvard University and PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  He is a SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geosciences where he has been a faculty member for over 45 years.  He is currently Director of the Mineral Physics Institute. Dr. Weidner’s research focuses on understanding the deep Earth by understanding the rocks and minerals that make up this inaccessible region. He has developed several new experimental tools to this end.  He currently is involved in synchrotron research on samples at high pressure and temperature.  His group runs a beamline at the Advanced Light Source in Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago and is building one at the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.  He is winner of two international awards; the James B. Macelwane award of the American Geophysical Union in 1981 “For significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding early career scientist” and the Inga Lehmann award, also of the American Geophysical Union in 2011 “For outstanding contributions to the understanding of the structure, composition, and dynamics of the Earth’s mantle and core”. 

 

TBA

Joel Hurowitz

7:30 PM Friday
April 27, 2018
ESS 001

 

 

You may also be interested in the following lectures:
Astronomy Open Night,

The World of Physics and
The Living World
These lectures are usually held in ESS 001 at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays during the academic year.

Professional Development letters are available for teachers and geologists for attending these lectures.


Web pages describing earlier Geology Open Night presentations

Spring 1998Fall 1998, Spring 1999, Fall 1999, Spring 2000, Fall 2000, Spring 2001,
Fall 2001, Spring 2002, Fall 2002, Spring 2003, Fall 2003Spring 2004, Fall 2004,
Spring 2005, Fall 2005, Spring 2006, Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2007, Spring 2008,
Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011,
Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015
Fall 2015
, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017


Admission is FREE!

Presentations are in Room 001 ESS Building SUNY Stony Brook

How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?