The Department of Geosciences presents

Geology Open Night

 
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Spring 2001 Offerings

Open night lectures are usually on topics in the geosciences related to the current research of the faculty, staff and students at SUNY Stony Brook. These presentations are intended for:

  • those interested in new developments in the sciences

  • earth science high school students and teachers

  • undergraduate and graduate students in geosciences

  • professional geologists

In-service Credit is available for teachers attending the Geology Open Night lectures.


We will be having Geology Open Nights on
Friday February 23, 2001
Friday March 30, 2001
Friday April 27, 2001

7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 
Earth and Space Sciences Building 
Lecture Hall (Room 001)
SUNY Stony Brook Campus

How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?


 

You may also be interested in Astronomy Open Night lectures the first Friday of the month, The Worlds of Physics lectures the second Friday of the month and Marine Biology
Explorations Lectures
. They also provide lectures of interest to the public. In-service credit is also available for teachers for attending these lectures.

All of these lectures are in ESS OO1 Lecture Hall


There will be Refreshments and Demonstrations after the Geology Open Night Presentations.

Admission is Free!!


Web pages describing earlier Geology Open Night presentations
Spring 1998Fall 1998, Spring 1999, Fall 1999, Spring 2000, Fall 2000


 

"The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming"

Prof. Robert Cess

7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday February 23

"Disposal of Radioactive Waste Using Mineral-inspired Sepulcrates"

Prof. John Parise

7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday March 30

"The Mystery of the Explosion of Animal life"

Prof. Jeffrey S. Levinton

7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday April 27

 


Distinguished Prof. Robert Cess

Marine Sciences Research Center
SUNY Stony Brook

7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 
Friday February 23, 2001

"The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming"

Industrial activity has produced, over the past century, substantial modifications to the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere.  Amongst other things, this has led to an increase in the atmosphere’s so-called greenhouse effect that, by itself, should produce global warming.  In contrast, another compositional change, by itself, should produce global cooling.  This talk will focus on the mechanisms by which such compositional changes of the atmosphere can induce climatic change, and how this could relate to the observed temperature record.

 


Prof. John Parise
Department of Geosciences
SUNY Stony Brook

7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday March 30, 2001

"Disposal of Radioactive Waste using Mineral-inspired Sepulcrates"

The presently favored glass technology for securing radioactive waste relies on a thermodynamically dubious presumption that glass is stable over geologic time scales in spite of the fact that glass is known to be unstable over geological time scales. It is morally and politically irresponsible not to pursue other approaches, which would secure radioactive waste from release to the environment over geologic time scales – a process we term sepulcration to distinguish it from storage.  Ringwood and others noted several decades ago that certain minerals (zircon, titanite, monazite etc) contain substantial quantities of radioactive parent and daughter products over billions of years in a variety of geological environments, with no measurable leakage.  They suggested that these minerals should be used as analogs for developing stable waste forms. This talk will present preliminary results using these minerals as starting points to “design” new compounds with high and selective ion-exchange capacity, often using elements that rarely encounter each other in nature.  This approach relies on new sources of intense radiation and new X-ray methods, which will be described.



Prof. Jeffrey S. Levinton

Department of Ecology and Evolution
SUNY Stony Brook

7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday April 27, 2001

"The Mystery of the Explosion of Animal life"

About 150 years ago, Darwin wondered why there was an apparent sudden beginning to the fossil record of animal life. What he didn't realize was just how sudden the appearance really was. Darwin did not have access to radioactive decay clocks, which now have given us the answer. We have something like 3.5 billion years of fossil record and yet all of the modern animal groups appeared in the fossil record in less than 10 million years, about 530 million years ago. Why so sudden? The mystery deepens when molecular clocks were used to estimate the time of origin of animals. Molecular dates are far older than the fossils indicate. Are the rocks lying? Are the molecular clocks in need of a new battery?

 

Links 

The Cambrian Explosion: Exhibit Guide at The Hooper Virtual History Museum, Carleton University 

The Cambrian Explosion at Thinkquest

Large Gene Study Questions Cambrian Explosion

Life Goes for a Spin:  A topsy-turvy earth may have triggered an evolutionary big bang - Scientific American

Cambrian Explosion Web-site at the Department of Earth Sciences University of Bristol 


In-service credit available for teachers

If your school requires that you have a sequence of educational opportunities in order to receive in-service credit, please advise them that during the Spring Semester we will be offering one-hour of in-service credit for each of the:

Three Geology Open Nights
Meets last Friday of month

Four Astronomy Open Nights
Website for more information is: www.astro.sunysb.edu/openight/opennite.html
Meets first Friday of month

Four The Worlds of Physics - 
Web site for more information is: insti.physics.sunysb.edu/Physics/worlds.html
Meets second Friday of month

One Long Island Geologists Dinner

Geology Open Night, Astronomy Open Night and The Worlds of Physics meet in ESS 001 at 7:30 p.m.

We will offer 7.5 hours of in-service credit for the Long Island Geologists conference on the Geology of Long Island and Metropolitan New York on April 15, 2001

We will offer up to 7.5 hours for the Long Island Geologists field trip in June.

Long Island Geologists web site is: www.geo.sunysb.edu/lig/

A more detailed description can be found at this link.


There will be Refreshments and Demonstrations after the Presentations.

Admission is FREE!

Presentations are in Room 001 ESS Building SUNY Stony Brook

How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?