Organic Sorption and Cation Exchange Capacity 
of 
Glacial Sand, Long Island.

 

A Thesis presented by Sonya Boguslavsky

 

to

 

The Graduate School

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree 
of 
Master of Science in Earth and Space Sciences

 

State University of New York At Stony Brook

 

May, 2000

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Abstract

 

Acknowledgments

 

Introduction

 

Chapter 1. Methods

Samples

Analytical methods

Cation exchange capacity

Separation of the coatings

pH measurement

X-ray powder diffraction (XRD)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds

Surface area measurements

Total organic carbon (TOC)

 Chapter 2. Cation exchange capacity

Results

Actual and potential acidity

Discussion

 

Figures

Figure 1. Cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the core from Cathedral Pine County Park 
 
Figure 2. Cation exchange capacity of the sediments from Port Jefferson (sample 1), South Setauket (samples 6 and 7), Soil near Fox Pond and the beach cliff at David Weld Preserve 

Tables (All tables for Chapter 2 are on a separate web page. This file is about 190 kb.)

Table 1. Cation exchange capacity of the different types of material 

Table 2. Results of the measurement of cation exchange capacity 

Table 3. Cation exchange capacity of the sediments from Port Jefferson, South Setauket, David Weld Preserve, Fox pond and Cathedral Pine County Park 

Table 4. Relative ion concentration to the total cation exchange capacity 

Table 5. pH values (BaCl2 and pH) 

Table 6. Concentration of hydrogen ion in the core from Cathedral Pine County Park 

 Chapter 3. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds

Introduction

Approach

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

 

Figures

 

Figure 1 (A-D). The comparison among whole sand Kd, coatings Kd,  naked sand Kd, sonicated sand Kd but without separation of coatings, Kd HCl treated sand and the sum of coatings Kd * fraction of coatings and Kd of naked sand * fraction of naked sand

 

Figure 2. Correlation between the fraction of total organic carbon and Kd of the coatings. Coarse sand from Port Jefferson (samples 1 and 5) and coarse-medium sand from South Setauket (samples 6 and 7) 

 

Figure 3. Correlation between surface area and Kd of the coated sand, coarse sand from Port Jefferson (samples 1 and 5) and coarse-medium sand from South Setauket (samples 6 and 7)

Tables (All tables for Chapter 3 are on a separate web page. This file is about 75 kb.)

Table 1. The Kd values for the whole sand, the coatings, the naked sand, the sonicated sand without separation of coatings and the sand without iron compounds 

Table 2. Fraction of the coatings to the whole coated sand mass 

Table 3. The estimation of the contribution of the naked sand and the coatings to the sorption of the whole sand 

Table 4. Fraction of organic carbon 

Table 5. Surface area 

Table 6. The comparison among the log Koc whole sand, log Koc coatings, log Koc naked sand and predicted log Koc 

Table 7. The comparison between experimental and predicted Ksa 

Chapter 4. Composition of the coatings

Results

X-ray diffraction (XRD)

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

Total organic carbon (TOC)

Discussion

 

Figures

Figures 1 through 13 are not yet available.

Figure 1. XRD patterns of the air-dried fraction < 2 mm. Fine sand from beach cliff at David Weld Preserve (sample 10)

 

Figure 2 (A-B). The XRD patterns of 6M HCl treated and 300 0C heated sample 10

 

Figure 3. 2000 x SEM image. Coated mineral surface.

 

Figure 4. 2000 x SEM image. Coated mineral surface 

 

Figure 5. 2000 x SEM image of the grains ofthe coarse heavily coated sand from Port Jefferson (sample 1)

Figure 6. 1000 x SEM image. Small particles of clay are on the surface of the large grain

 

Figure 7. 1000 x SEM image. Surface of the sample 1 (coarse sand) 

 

Figure 8. 2000 x SEM image. Clear grain surface shows etch pits.

 

Figure 9. 1000 x SEM image Surface of the medium- coarse sand from Port Jefferson 

 

Figure 10. 2000 x SEM. Surface of the coarse sand from Port Jefferson.

 

Figure 11. 1000 x SEM Laminar clay structure in the fine sand 

 

Figure 12. 75 x SEM Mica shaped grains 

 

Figure 13 (A-D). TEM and SAED images of the clay particles 

 

Figure 14. Ternary diagram shows compositional range of illite, chlorite, kaolinite and celadonite and chemical composition of the coating 

Tables

Table 1. Basal reflection d-spacing for common clay minerals. 

Table 2. Fraction of the coatings and the fraction of the total organic carbon measured on the whole sand and the coatings 

 

 References