The Department of Geosciences presents

Geology Open Night

Spring 2019

 

 

The Enigmatic Pebbly Loess

Gil Hanson

7:30 PM Friday
Feb. 15, 2019
ESS 001

TBA

Lars Ehm

7:30 PM Friday
Mar. 8, 2019
ESS 001

TBA

Baoshen Li

7:30 PM Friday
April 12, 2019
ESS 001

Earth and Space Sciences Building 
Lecture Hall (Room 001)
SUNY Stony Brook Campus

Admission is Free!!

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How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?

NYS teachers who wish to receive one hour of CTLE credit for any of these lectures must register here:
 https://goo.gl/forms/pfdNLevMTO8VfbJ02.
You must register for each lecture you attend and sign-in at the lecture.
The Graduate School will send a CTLE certificate about six weeks after each lecture

 


Geology Open night lectures are usually on topics in the geosciences related to the current research of the faculty, staff and students at Stony Brook University. These presentations are intended for:

  • those interested in new developments in the sciences

  • earth science high school students and teachers

  • undergraduate and graduate students in geosciences

  • professional geologists

NYS teachers who wish to receive one hour of CTLE credit for any of these lectures must register here:
 https://goo.gl/forms/pfdNLevMTO8VfbJ02.
You must register for each lecture you attend and sign-in at the lecture.
The Graduate School will send a CTLE certificate about six weeks after each lecture

 

 

The Enigmatic Pebbly Loess

 

Gil Hanson

7:30 PM Friday
Feb. 15, 2019
ESS 001

Earth-science-education student researchers at Stony Brook University have found that much of the undisturbed areas of Long Island are covered with loess. Generally, loess is tan well sorted, wind-blown silt with minor sand and clay. Long Island loess, however, has pebbles. Dominguez, 2015, however, found that pebbly loess was not well sorted. Instead, it is an unsorted sediment, a diamict. This is consistent with the findings of Clare, 2013, who showed that pebbly loess has the same grain-size characteristics as the underlying till.

Kundic, 2005, dated the deposition of the pebbly loess to be about 13,000 years ago. Tvelia, 2015, found that pebbly loess in Rocky Point contains charcoal, magnetic spherules, carbonaceous spherules and scoria-like objects (melted rock). These data are consistent with extensive, forest fires and the impacts of fragments of a comet or asteroid at about 13,000 years ago during the Younger Dryas (12,900 to 11,500 years ago) when the climate returned to near glacial conditions (Wolbach et al, 2018a, and 2018b). 

Earth-science-education student researchers at Stony Brook University have found pebbly loess in Suffolk, Nassau and Westchester counties. They found that the pebbles are dominantly quartz and are typically 1 cm in diameter but may be up to 5 cm in diameter. In their research they are also considering whether the characteristics of the soil developed on pebbly loess influence whether deciduous forests or pine barrens occur in undeveloped areas.

Carolina bays are abundant features along the Atlantic Coastal Plain including Suffolk County. They are elliptical to circular-shaped, shallow depressions with closed rims and flat bottoms. In Rocky Point Tvelia, 2015, found pebbly loess in the area surrounding the Carolina bays as well as in the rims and flat interior. This suggests that the pebbly loess and Carolina bays have a common origin.

Dr. Hanson is a distinguished service professor in the Department of Geosciences. He has been interested in the geology and environmental problems of Long Island for the last couple of decades. Earth science education students, earth science teachers, and MS in Geosciences students carried out most of this research.

 

 

TBA

 

Lars Ehm

7:30 PM Friday
Mar. 8, 2019
ESS 001

 

TBA

 

Baosheng Li

7:30 PM Friday
April 12, 2019
ESS 001

 

 

You may also be interested in the following lectures:
Astronomy Open Night,

The World of Physics and
The Living World
These lectures are usually held in ESS 001 at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays during the academic year.

Professional Development letters are available for teachers and geologists for attending these lectures.


Web pages describing earlier Geology Open Night presentations

Spring 1998Fall 1998, Spring 1999, Fall 1999, Spring 2000, Fall 2000, Spring 2001,
Fall 2001, Spring 2002, Fall 2002, Spring 2003, Fall 2003Spring 2004, Fall 2004,
Spring 2005, Fall 2005, Spring 2006, Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2007, Spring 2008,
Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011,
Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015
Fall 2015
, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018


Admission is FREE!

Presentations are in Room 001 ESS Building SUNY Stony Brook

How do I get to the Earth and Space Sciences Building at SUNY Stony Brook?